Tuesday Photo Challenge – Round Up 58

A lovely set of streets!

Welcome to the 58th round up of the Tuesday Photo Challenge!

You took to the streets and provided a great deal of wonderful insight!  I really appreciate the great posts that you provided and particularly enjoyed your creative way to approach some of the subtleties that make for great photographs of streets and street photography.

Thank you for all those wonderful posts and providing me with some inspiring posts to read!

Now that I’m back (and spent a good part of the day off-loading my images and organizing them), I took a quick stab at this view of one of the streets in Volterra…

20170522-Volterra_DSF1356_7_8_tonemapped
Streets of Volterra

Volterra is a town that should be on everyone’s must visit list in Tuscany; it has a true charm and great variety of sites to visit all well within walking distance.  From Etruscan to Roman and Renaissance, there is wonderful representation within Volterra.

The following were this week’s participants in the challenge with links to their posts:

  • Starting this week’s entries, theonlyD800inthehameau brings us to Carcassonne in Southern France to explore the old city!
  • Une Photo, un poéme shows us of Bucharest’s changes, as the city is moving more towards modernity.
  • Charles captures some of the color in Puerto Rico in his post in charlesewaugh.com; I agree that it definitely is a photographer’s paradise!
  • pensivity101 brings the pleasures of travel to the agoraphobic in a rather clever poem!
  • A very different view of the world is provided by iballrtw‘s post that shows us a bazaar in New Delhi.
  • Wow, ladyleemanilla, what an impressive array of streets and awesome music to accompany them!
  • Bullyboy shows off the bends and slopes of the streets in an impressive set of photos in Travel387.
  • Mostly Monochrome is an impressive blog with amazing photography done the old-fashioned way (do you remember film?); go check it out!
  • Susan captured a beautiful street in Amsterdam, as you can only find them there, in her entry in Musin’ with Susan.
  • Miriam’s post in the Showers of Blessing takes us to some great locations for streets.  I particularly like Seville, Spain!
  • Leaking Ink takes us into the city of Lucknow with a view of the Rumi Darwaz.
  • Ron’s post in Progressing Into Solitude talks of the promises of streets of silver in Virginia City with a great photo!
  • Stella’s post in Giggles & Tales shows us streets in various cities; there is wonderful character in these streets!
  • Justine shares lovely views of streets in her beautifully photographed entry in Justine Taylor Photography.
  • Bushboy’s street is probably not your average, run-of-the-mill street, particularly when he finds a herd of cattle being driven past his driveway in bushboys world!
  • Cee brings us a wonderful set of photos in her post in Cee’s Photography!
  • Judith brings us closer to some of the wonderful art that is in the streets in here post in Nature Knows Best; it truly looks magnificent!
  • Debbie’s post in ForgivingConnects has happiness written all over it with the prospect of Colorado!
  • Khürt’s post in his blog Island in the Net takes us to the streets with wonderful images!
  • Ron brings us a variety of streets in his cool blog Locating Frankenstein’s Brain!
  • Grace might not look forward to driving on winding roads, but she certainly got some nice photos of them in her post in Following Him Beside Still Waters.

This is another great set of images, posts and participation! Thanks to each of you for taking the time and being creative!

Author: jansenphoto

A Fresh Perspective Photography is more than just a vehicle for capturing the world around me; it provides me with a palette and a set of brushes, with which I paint not only what I see, but also look to express the emotions that are evoked by the scene in front of me in that moment. Growing up in the Netherlands exposed me to a wide cross-section of visual arts that laid the foundation of my photographic view of all that surrounds me. Early influences were the Dutch Masters of the 17th century, to whom I was introduced by my grandfather during museum explorations; favorites among them are the scenes of quotidian life depicted by Jan Steen and Frans Hals and the vivid landscapes of Jacob van Ruisdael. My classical high school education was supplemented by the Boijmans Van Beuningen museum, where I spent many a lunch hour exploring its great collection. Here I was introduced to surrealism with a particular love for the approach taken by Salvador Dali; Dali also rekindled my appreciation for the work of Hieronymus Bosch, who often showed the folly of us mortals. Universal Connections My approach to any photographic subject is to look for understanding first; in this I look to establish either a connection between the viewer and the subject or capture the connection of the subject with its surroundings. The captured image then aims to portray this connection from a perspective that is part of my personal interpretation. This interpretation is often a form of externalized introspection, which may alternately display the connection of isolated beings and items with their environment or highlight the whimsy of the profound world, in which we find ourselves. The universe is full of connections, many of which are waiting to be discovered; part of my journey as a photographer is to document these connections. Any assignment, be it an event, a product shoot or a portrait session is always approached through communication with the client; this is where the first connection is established. Ideas are exchanged and a collaborative plan of action forms, ultimately resulting in a set of images that aim to exceed the expectations of each client. And, lest we forget, it is important to have fun while practicing the serious business of photography!

12 thoughts on “Tuesday Photo Challenge – Round Up 58”

  1. Hi Frank, I did not have time to take part in your ‘Street’ challenge and the post you mention above was linked to your ‘Travel’ challenge from the week before 😉

  2. Your post said “Good Morning!” from my inbox at 5:00 AM this morning.It was a gift. A reminder of less contentious, simpler, older, more respectful way of being human. The aesthetics of architecture and the natural cobblestone street,the conversation on the street corner, and the lighting all bring a deep sense of calm. . . and hope that a world where even instant gratification is too slow might yet slow down, turn off all the gadgets that take us to places we aren’t, and rediscover ourselves outside the illusions of speed and grandeur. Thank you for this lovely photo and description.

      1. I think Dutchmen tend to have a greater appreciation for older things than most Americans.

        Speaking of which, Dutch philosopher of religion Willem Zuurdeeg was a huge influence on my way of seeing the world. He’s behind the lens of “Be Still! Departure from Collective Madness” (Jan. 6, 2017, Wipf and Stock).

        Life in our time is much too fast. Glad you had this special time to unwind in Italy.

      2. I’ll have to check out Zuurdeeg, as I had not heard of him. As the Dutch have been world travelers for a long time, there is a sense of appreciation for much that the world has to offer; it’s a good thing to do, as it allows for a more balanced point of view.

        Thank you!!

      3. Zuurdeeg’s family was part of the WWII underground. He became Professor of Philosophy of Religion at McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago and author of “An Analytical Philosophy of Religion” and “Man Before Chaos: Philosophy Is Born in a Cry”.

        “Be Still! Departure from Collective Madness” (published this year and available on Amazon.com) is heavily influenced by him.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s