Isle of Mull – pt. 2

Religion and sheep!

In this second installment about our visit to beloved Mull, we pick up the era between 600 BC and AD 400, when Iron Age inhabitants were building protective forts, duns and crannogs. Whether or not they were Picts is unclear.

In the 6th century, Irish migrants invaded Mull and the surrounding coast, establishing the Gaelic kingdom of Dál Riata. The kingdom was divided into a number of regions, each controlled by a kin group, of which the Cenél Loairn controlled Mull and the adjacent mainland to the east. Dál Riata was a springboard for the Christianisation of the mainland; the pivotal point was AD 563, when Columba, an Irish missionary, arrived at Iona (just off the south-west point of Mull) and founded a monastery, from which to start evangelising the local population.

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The Monastery on Iona

Another thing that we learned during our visit to Mull, is that the significant number of sheep roam free everywhere on the island and do not concern themselves with traffic; on the mostly single-track road one may have to stop for sheep that find it a comfortable place to rest.

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Mull’s Sheep

The other aspect about sheep is that they will eat whatever they find; therefore, if you want a garden you put up a fence that is necessary to keep the sheep out!

Have a wonderful day, wherever you are in the world!

Author: jansenphoto

A Fresh Perspective Photography is more than just a vehicle for capturing the world around me; it provides me with a palette and a set of brushes, with which I paint not only what I see, but also look to express the emotions that are evoked by the scene in front of me in that moment. Growing up in the Netherlands exposed me to a wide cross-section of visual arts that laid the foundation of my photographic view of all that surrounds me. Early influences were the Dutch Masters of the 17th century, to whom I was introduced by my grandfather during museum explorations; favorites among them are the scenes of quotidian life depicted by Jan Steen and Frans Hals and the vivid landscapes of Jacob van Ruisdael. My classical high school education was supplemented by the Boijmans Van Beuningen museum, where I spent many a lunch hour exploring its great collection. Here I was introduced to surrealism with a particular love for the approach taken by Salvador Dali; Dali also rekindled my appreciation for the work of Hieronymus Bosch, who often showed the folly of us mortals. Universal Connections My approach to any photographic subject is to look for understanding first; in this I look to establish either a connection between the viewer and the subject or capture the connection of the subject with its surroundings. The captured image then aims to portray this connection from a perspective that is part of my personal interpretation. This interpretation is often a form of externalized introspection, which may alternately display the connection of isolated beings and items with their environment or highlight the whimsy of the profound world, in which we find ourselves. The universe is full of connections, many of which are waiting to be discovered; part of my journey as a photographer is to document these connections. Any assignment, be it an event, a product shoot or a portrait session is always approached through communication with the client; this is where the first connection is established. Ideas are exchanged and a collaborative plan of action forms, ultimately resulting in a set of images that aim to exceed the expectations of each client. And, lest we forget, it is important to have fun while practicing the serious business of photography!

7 thoughts on “Isle of Mull – pt. 2”

  1. Interesting post. It seems that every group of people since the beginning of time have invaded other territory at one time or another thinking their way was best. Then when the next group invades the territory that our ancestors invaded they claim it has always been their home land. Insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.(not sure if this is an Einstein quote or unknown but it fits) When will we ever learn to live in harmony and realize all borders are a figments of our imagination and our beliefs are dependent on our experiences, family, and community. Love the sheep – they live in peace. Have a blessed day!

    1. It’s very true that ‘civilization’ is a series of conquests rather than collaborative progress over the centuries. We can hope that this will change in the future, as we’re sliding in the wrong direction in the current age; nationalism is a recipe for disaster across the globe, which definitely has mind share in many countries. Until we can erase that, there’s little hope.

      My first suggestion would be to have people travel more to meet people of all countries.

      Have a wonderful day!

      1. Agree. My adult children, nieces and nephews have expanded and met people from all over the world. Their friends are from a variety of religious beliefs, nationalities, cultures and races. Even in the USA from urban to suburbia to rural locations there is so much variety to include socioeconomic and by expanding ourselves we learn to understand and live with everyone. Wishing my grandchildren will be witness to a more collaborative world and still have hope of seeing this in my own lifetime. It starts with us and as we shine our light others may be drawn to it as well. Love and Light!

  2. Thank you for these lovely, educational posts. Indeed we are, at our base, all just humans who were born in one place or another through an accident (or larger plan) of birth … all connected to some form of conquest (or the spoils of war through all the mean mankind has been know to use other humans as commodity or receptacles) … all more alike than not. Geography or religion (or level of melanin in the skin, for that matter) are the smaller denominator in what makes us humans. Our humanity (and humaneness) is what should take the lead. Take good care!

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