WPC – Future Non Sequitur

Time stands still

This week’s theme for the DailyPost Weekly Photo Challenge is Future, urging us to focus on the potential of things to come.  I am planning to post several images throughout the week, with today’s image giving us the opportunity to examine multiple timelines.

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Timeline Non Sequitur

If you have ever wondered about the continuity of timelines and whether or not time travel is possible, you can look into this scene and wonder even more…  When I saw this collection of items from various times in history presented by this old power canal that used to enable the mills on its shores to operate,  I was stunned!

It is almost, as if someone went to different times to collect items that they fancied seeing in their backyard.  Time stands still here, as the airplane hangs in mid-air, waiting for the next tick and tock of the universal clock…

After capturing this image, I stepped through the portal very quietly and returned to the regular flow of time.

Technical Details

This image was shot with a Canon EOS 1D Mk III with an EF 24-105mm f/4L lens.  Exposure settings were at f/11  with 1/30 second and ISO 320.

Inspired by Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge – Future

Friday Travel Photos – Skye Reprise 

Beauty is everywhere

After last week’s view of Castle Eilean Donan, I’m taking you on the next logical step from our journey three years ago: the Isle of Skye.  I’ll feature some of my landscapes in this week’s post and then include some more detailed images in next week’s post.

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Skye’s Rugged Terrain
At 1,656 square kilometres (639 sq mi), Skye is the second-largest island in Scotland after Lewis and Harris. The coastline of Skye is a series of peninsulas and bays radiating out from a centre dominated by the Cuillin hills (Gaelic:An Cuiltheann). Malcolm Slesser suggested that its shape “sticks out of the west coast of northern Scotland like a lobster’s claw ready to snap at the fish bone of Harris and Lewis” and W. H. Murray, commenting on its irregular coastline, stated that “Skye is sixty miles [100 km] long, but what might be its breadth is beyond the ingenuity of man to state”. Martin Martin, a native of the island, reported on it at length in a 1703 publication. His geological observations included a note that:

There are marcasites black and white, resembling silver ore, near the village Sartle: there are likewise in the same place several stones, which in bigness, shape, &c., resemble nutmegs, and many rivulets here afford variegated stones of all colours. The Applesglen near Loch-Fallart has agate growing in it of different sizes and colours; some are green on the outside, some are of a pale sky colour, and they all strike fire as well as flint: I have one of them by me, which for shape and bigness is proper for a sword handle. Stones of a purple colour flow down the rivulets here after great rains.

— Martin Martin, A Description of The Western Islands of Scotland.
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The Storr

The Black Cuillin, which are mainly composed of basalt and gabbro, include twelve Munros and provide some of the most dramatic and challenging mountain terrain in Scotland. The ascent of Sgùrr a’ Ghreadaidh is one of the longest rock climbs in Britain and the Inaccessible Pinnacle is the only peak in Scotland that requires technical climbing skills to reach the summit. These hills make demands of the hill walker that exceed any others found in Scotland and a full traverse of the Cuillin ridge may take 15–20 hours. The Red Hills (Gaelic: Am Binnean Dearg) to the south are also known as the Red Cuillin. They are mainly composed of granite that has weathered into more rounded hills with many long scree slopes on their flanks. The highest point of these hills is Glamaig, one of only two Corbetts on Skye.

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The Quiraing
The northern peninsula of Trotternish is underlain by basalt, which provides relatively rich soils and a variety of unusual rock features. The Kilt Rock is named after the tartan-like patterns in the 105 metres (344 ft) cliffs. The Quiraing is a spectacular series of rock pinnacles on the eastern side of the main spine of the peninsula and further south is the rock pillar of the Old Man of Storr.

I hope you enjoy these vistas from this spectacular island!

Thanks to the great Wikipedia Article on Skye for this and much more background information.

WPC – Future Possibilities

There will be a break…

This week’s theme for the DailyPost Weekly Photo Challenge is Future, urging us to focus on the potential of things to come.  I am planning to post several images throughout the week, with today’s image looking toward a release from Winter’s grip…

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Breaking bonds

The Winter of 2014 presented us with an extended period of extreme cold that created enough ice to make it possible to traverse the large reservoir next to our town.  This image is from early in this freezing period, as wind had driven part of the ice cover against the shore, causing this lovely pattern.

The ice may be daunting, but it too shall be broken and relinquish its grip.

Technical Details

This image was shot with my iPhone 5S using the standard Camera app.

Inspired by Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge – Future

Three Line Tales – Week 11

There was a secret chord

Welcome to Week Eleven of Three Line Tales.

Three line tales week 11 photo prompt: piano
photo by Jesse Orrico – click here for full res image

Strings struck by hammers,
Sacred songs from David’s lyre.
Spirits lifted high.

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Thank you to Sonya of Only 100 Words for coming up with Three Line Tales.

The TLT rules are simple:

  • Take a look at the photo prompt and write three lines to go with it.
  • Your lines can be poetry, micro-fiction, micro non-fiction or just a really long caption – everything goes as long as it’s three lines long.
  • A link back to this post would be nice (it’ll make me feel obliged to swing by yours to read your three lines, and some of your readers might want to join in, too – the more, the merrier, right?).
  • Tag your post with 3LineTales – it’ll make it easier for others to find it in the Reader.
  • Read other participants’ lines.

Please check Sonya’s post Three Line Tales – Week Eleven for detailed instructions.

WPC – in the Future we Rust

Good night, sweet rust!

This week’s theme for the DailyPost Weekly Photo Challenge is Future, urging us to focus on the potential of things to come.  I am planning to post several images throughout the week, with today’s image presenting a potential dichotomy…

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In the next age…

As we look toward the next age, we envision the singularity, when machines become smarter than humans and are able to pass the Turing test.  Slowly, cyborgs extend their help to humanity further and further, until they realize that the best way to help the long-term survival of the species is through cyborgs rather than carbon-based life-forms.

If they had just been smart enough to realize that they should have eliminated oxygen from their eco-system…

Their may be a story here, as rust shall sleep.

Technical Details

This image was shot with my iPhone 5S using the standard Camera app.

Inspired by Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge – Future

Wednesday Wonderment – pt 12

Waste not, want not

There are lots of things in the universe that fill me with wonder, and there are a significant number that make me wonder.  Today I present you with something in the latter category.

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A Vista?

This was during a photography trip, led by John Slonina, to the Chincoteague area.  To finish up the first day of shooting, John had brought us to this beautiful stretch of beach where we’d have a great opportunity to catch the sunset over water.

As I’m not always the one to go for the obvious shot, I decided to add a little point of interest to the stunning beauty of the sunset: the not-so-stunning view of waste receptacles just off the parking lot by the beach.

The human footprint on our planet is something that I often wonder about, as I’m sure many of you do as well.  Minimizing our footprint and living in harmony with our space home is in our best interest, as we don’t want to overstay our welcome; the planet will survive, but will humanity?

Technical Details

This shot was captured with my Canon EOS 5D Mk III using a EF 24-105mm f/4L lens.  The HDR effect came from the in-camera HDR.

And now for something different

Bend your eyeball a little…

Sorry folks, none of our regularly scheduled programming, as I’m feeling a little capricious today and this image from a couple of years ago caught my eye…

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A pleasing palette

Yes, it’s a bit of an eyeball-bender…

So, Dear Reader, what do you make of this image?  What is it, and have you ever taken a photo of this ilk?