Friday’s Mystery Slide

What kind of gas do we have here?

Today, I want to start something a little different: present you with a mystery.  Not a deep, dark mystery to be sure, but, rather, something from the past that may interest both young and old.

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Holy Gasbag! What do we have here?

This image is a scan from a slide, that was not taken by me; I came upon a collection of slides that my father-in-law was going to throw out (they were wrapped up neatly in a paper towel with tape marked trash on them).

Luckily, he was nice enough to check and see, if I wanted the containers that they were stored in, so I asked him, if I could have the slides too.  He kind of shrugged and said, “Sure”.

This was a couple of years ago and I promptly bought a slide scanner, but never touched them until this week.  After getting a new driver for the scanner from the manufacturer in Taiwan, I fired it up last night and let it scan the first 36 slides.

That is when I noticed this slide that I present to you as a mystery.  What do you make of it?  What is this location?  What is its purpose?

Hope you enjoy this little mystery.  If you do, I may bring out more slides from this collection.  I’m curious to see what all of you can bring to the light.

Three Line Tales – Week 3

Haiku of change

three line tales micro fiction and micro poetry writing challenge
photo by Sonya – full res version on Unsplash

Sunrise and sunset
Changing the world around us.
Transmogrifying?

****

Thank you to Sonya of Only 100 Words for coming up with Three Line Tales.

The TLT rules are simple:

  • Take a look at the photo prompt and write three lines to go with it.
  • Your lines can be poetry, micro-fiction, micro non-fiction or just a really long caption – everything goes as long as it’s three lines long.
  • A link back to this post would be nice (it’ll make me feel obliged to swing by yours to read your three lines, and some of your readers might want to join in, too – the more, the merrier, right?).
  • Tag your post with 3LineTales – it’ll make it easier for others to find it in the Reader.
  • Read other participants’ lines.

Please check Sonya’s post Three Line Tales – Week Three for detailed instructions.

Dogstar Thursday – vol. 4

Faster, higher, stronger!

This week, I am going back to one of my many agility photos and am picking one of my favorite obstacles to photograph, the A-frame.

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Whoooaaa!

This image was taken in October, 2010, at the Cape Cod Kennel Club AKC agility trial in Falmouth, Massachusetts.  It was a beautiful day with great light and a pretty good breeze, so the dogs were ready to run!

Clearly, this pug had a good head of steam, when cresting the A-frame, which, for this jump height, stands at 5’0″ (apps. 1.52 m).  For a small dog, that is quite a height; if we’d scale this for the average human, it would be 4-5 times as high!  Luckily, these dogs are well-trained and quite used to it, but it is still a feat of courage for them to fly over this A-frame at speed.

Out of curiosity, have any of you run your dogs in agility or other competitions?

Dragon’s Loyalty Award

Welcome to my lair!

Dragon's Loyalty Award

Dear Reader, begging your indulgence, I’d like to share with you that I have been nominated for the Dragon’s Loyalty Award!  As a small repayment for your indulgence, I promise that this is the last reward that I am posting.  As much as I enjoy receiving awards, I want to make sure that my blog stays on point, as much as possible, which means that I want to focus its content on you, my much appreciated Readers!

First of all, a great big thank you to Sherri, aka MysticalWriter, who thought me deserving of this award.  I have been following Sherri’s blog for quite a while and love her take on the universe and, particularly, her posts on crystals and minerals, which are extermely informative.  So go check her out at MysticalWriter.

Here’s the rules for this award, should you want to accept it:

☆Award Rules:

1. Display the award on your blog.
2. Announce your win with a post and link back to the nominator.
3. Present 6 deserving bloggers with the award.
4. Link your awardees in the post.
5. Write 7 interesting things about you.

Interesting Facts:

What could be 7 interesting facts about me?  It’s a little tricky; after all, what I might find interesting, might be mundane to you…  However, here’s an attempt:

  1. While I was still in elementary school, I learned to speak basic English from kids in a British family, who lived in a windmill close to where I lived in the Netherlands.
  2. I learned to read basic hieroglyphics, so that I could understand some of the writing on Egyptian artifacts that I saw in museums.
  3. My high school was closed to an excellent museum in Rotterdam, so I often spent lunch time looking at Dali and Bosch paintings.
  4. I have walked with a wolf, who accepted me enough to even lean into my leg and let me photograph her at eye level.
  5. I find moose amazing animals, who posses untapped grace.
  6. I have caught fish by walking through gullies in a part of the sea that falls dry at low tide, and feeling the fish wiggle underfoot.
  7. I didn’t see my first computer until I went to college.

My Nominees:

  1. (b)ananartista
  2. Rational romantic mystical cynical idealist
  3. One more shot please
  4. Lifelessons
  5. Cait
  6. Inside the red’s head

Enjoy!!

Quotes of Worth – vol 1

Exploring the unknown

“Whether you succeed or not is irrelevant, there is no such thing. Making your unknown known is the important thing–and keeping the unknown always beyond you.”
– Georgia O’Keeffe

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Arbor Fugit

Bringing the unknown into the light, exploring what might lie hidden, changing our view of the world around us, these are all aspect of the Kryptomorphaics series.

Here, in Arbor Fugit, I explore the energies that are stored in this powerful weeping willow, its ability to filter and re-radiate the light that it accepts from the Sun.  One of the surprising aspects to me was the variety in color cast that came from this wondrous tree.

What do you sense in this image?  Does it call out certain things?

Wednesday Wonderment – pt 4

A strange kind of magic

This week, we are travelling a bit to the north to touch the arctic circle.  Last year, I had the pleasure to spend 4 days in Iceland, which were not nearly enough to take in its beauty, but gave me a taste for more.

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Lake Mývatn

For 3 of the 4 days, I stayed in Akureyri, which is on the northern coast of Iceland; it is the second largest population center in Iceland with around 18,000 people.  Through AirBnB, I had found a lovely farm where I had a room overlooking a fjord, and wonderful hosts.

I did my exploring in the area around Akureyri and found some amazing sights, such as the Mývatn area, where I found this rather surreal landscape.  Lesser known than the Blue Lagoon in southern Iceland, Lake Mývatn is also the beneficiary of a geothermal plant.  The light blue hue is due to the rich mineral content of the silica sediment that settles on the bottom; think lots of sulphur!

Hope you enjoy this image!

TTT – Abstract Photography – Ep. 3

Driving force behind a project

Gold and Green Composition
Gold and Green in Motion

Over the pass couple of weeks I have covered concepts and techniques, and I promised to do a bit of a deeper dive into what lies beneath the surface of the process of capturing these images.

In terms of photographic technique, the ideas are rather simple and mastered relatively quickly.  Most of my personal photography projects tend not to last very long, as quickly I start looking for novel ways to capture and present material; at such a time, I usually put the project aside for at least a year or so, waiting for it to feel fresh again when I go for the next image in a series.  This project has been different, in that I have been shooting in this genre for more than 4 years thus far, and it has not felt stale to me yet.  As this surprised me somewhat, I started looking into the how and why this project is different.

There are several elements that I uncovered, which make the Kryptomorphaics project different from prior efforts:

  • on-going discovery
  • emotional connectivity
  • re-examination
I am certain that there are other elements that I may uncover, as I push forward in this project, but these appear to be the drivers at this time.

Discovery – photography is a journey of discovery for just about all of us, who have picked up a camera and started shooting in earnest.  This project has afforded me continual discovery through opening up all senses and taking input from all of them in the process of capturing content that is not just visible to the eye.  This deeper sense of uncovering this cryptic that lies hidden within the world around us has opened my mind’s eye to further explore these scenes in new directions.  These include examination of the scene not only in its current juncture within the space-time continuum, but also past and future lines that may be occupied by the players on stage within the scene.  This has opened up some connections that I had hitherto not observed, some of which demonstrate how universal forces flow through the quotidian.

Berries in Motion
Berries in Motion

Emotional Connectivity – as I deepened my exploration, part of which included opening up all senses to the environment in which I found myself, I started noticing a sense of emotional connection to what I found within the scene.  In a manner, which can be likened to meditation, a more complete sense of the image, as it should be captured, is refined by opening up the senses to subtle emotional triggers.  It can be described as opening oneself up to a feeling washing over the entire being and letting that guide the decision making process for how to capture the image.  This feeling is more pronounced for certain images that others.

Re-Examination –  upon capturing an image, the next thing I do is a taking stock of how it felt to capture the image.  I take sensory stock of the image rather than examining it visually (I am not a big fan of chimping, but one could say that this is a sort of sensory chimping).  Without looking at the image, I will then make a decision to either shoot the scene with some adjustment, which can be slight or radical, or if it feels just right, I then walk away from it.

Mystery in Green
Mystery in Green

I find that the success of the process depends more on my ability to quiet all my senses and open myself up to my surroundings; this is where the simile with mediation extends, as I will use meditation techniques to improve my feel for the environment.  In this process, I do not over-analyze how I might be able to capture the feeling that lies before my lens; a couple of rough guesstimates guide my camera settings adjustments, as I let intuition be my guide.

This wraps up this 3-part series on abstract photography, but, fear not!  From time to time, I will feature an image from my Kryptomorphaics collection to discuss it in more detail.

I sincerely hope you enjoyed this introduction and look forward to hearing what other topics might interest you.