3 Day Quote Challenge (Day 1)

The cows come home for today’s quote

 

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The Cows are Hamming it Up!

“The cow is of the bovine ilk; one end is moo, the other milk.”
– Ogden Nash, Freewheeling.

The 3 Day Quote Challenge

This is the first day of the 3-day quote challenge that I was given by Mysticalwriter.  First of all thank you for given me the challenge.  My plan is to use one of my photos each day and find some quote to go with the photo.
Today’s quote is from one of my favorite light-versed poets, Ogden Nash; his wit is always a lot of fun!

Here are the rules:

One quote a day for three days. They can be your quotes or quotes from other people. Post one a day for three days and nominate three bloggers per post. Also, thank the person that nominated you.
My nominees for today are:
  1. Third Time Lucky
  2. Idiot.With.Camera
  3. itonlytakesonepiece

Have fun!

I received a Liebster Award!

Now this was a real surprise!

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I was pleasantly surprised when Angel nominated me for the “LIEBSTER AWARD”. Thank you so much for considering my blog worth this award.  As I am just finishing up the Blogging101 course, I am truly honored and excited!

Thank you very much, Angel!  Please check out her blog, where she has lots of uplifting posts and interesting posts, as she tries to make things of the hard things in life!

Now, for those who have not heard about the award, here are the rules:

  1. Thank your nominator
  2. Show the award on your blog
  3. Answer 10 questions asked to you
  4. Ask 10 questions to 10 new nominees (who have less than 200 followers)
  5. Notify them

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Thank you once again, Angel, as I can’t thank you enough for this nomination!

10 Questions asked to me by Angel.

  1. What was your first thought when you read about your nomination?  I was simply overjoyed, as it came completely out of the blue.
  2. What is your favourite thing about blogging?  The ability to interact with other bloggers, and get their feedback on what I post.
  3. Would you take more classes like Blogging101? Why? Blogging101 was a tremendous kickstart to finally get my blog out of the doldrums; I’m looking for additional classes to continue this drive forward.
  4. Is there a specific thing you would like to blog about but have not yet?  There are some drafts building up right now, so stay tuned for some completely new material.
  5. What will your blog look like in five years? Hopefully, it will continue to evolve and become ever more inspiring to my fellow bloggers.  As my graphic design skills improve, the look and feel of my blog should grow with these skills.
  6. What inspires you? A unique view into the world around me.  A moment of perfect stillness.  Completing a tricky task.  Inspiring someone else to stretch their abilities.
  7. What drives you nuts? Mindless people, by and large…
  8. If you were reborn – who would you be?  I’d come back as an artistic scientist…
  9. From today’s perspective: If you could change an event that happened in your life would you do it?  There are lots of things that I might do differently with hindsight, but it’s not too useful to dwell on the past.
  10. What is your inner child’s favourite activity?  Musing over things, challenging myself.

The following bloggers are my nominees for the “Liebster” award, and I hope they accept it:

  1. The Inkwell
  2. soFarsoStu
  3. Blue Car Painted Green
  4. Raines Journal
  5. Booksmart
  6. justbluedutch
  7. paperclipsandpins
  8. Gerry Wilson
  9. Poems in the Wild
  10. Spark!

Nominees are kindly requested to answer the following 10 questions:

  1. Why did you start blogging?
  2. How do you feel about being nominated?
  3. What is your opinion about Blogging101?
  4. What are your hobbies other than blogging?
  5. What inspires you the most?
  6. Is this your first/only blog or do you have other blogs too?
  7. How would you describe your blog?
  8. What are the things that annoy you?
  9. who would you want to be if you were reborn?
  10. What is the message you want to give to your readers through your blog?

Keep on blogging!!

Thank you all!

Let’s Talk Some Trash!

Broncos will be busted with some Patriot missiles!!

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Return for Refill!

The work week is coming to an end once again, or at least slowing down a bit, as there will be some testing that I’ll continue over the weekend.

Of course, like most of you, I have plans for the weekend, but most of them will be rather pleasant and relaxing, as I’m not overdoing it after fighting off this nasty stomach bug!  So here it goes…

  • Guitar lesson on Saturday!  Yes, this will be an hour of fun, as my guitar teacher makes it enjoyable and ensures that at the end of an hour’s playing, I always feel better about my ability than I should realistically.
  • The basement project shall continue…I’ll at least spend a couple of hours to further progress.  Baby steps!!
  • Hang with the dogs!  Did I ever mention that Cardigans are a blast to hang around with?
  • Hopefully not clear too much snow…the forecasters are saying that most will stay south of us, but you never know!
  • And watch the all-important game this weekend, as the Patriots exact revenge on the Broncos to complete their next step in the Farewell Goodell Tour!  Sorry Peyton (not really), but this is not your time, as Brady has his weapons of choice and will not be denied!

Enough trash talk for the moment!  What are your plans for the weekend?  Whatever they are, have a great one!!

How did you learn photography? (part 3)

Photographing agility competitions allowed me to hone my camera skills

Building more skills

Photographing agility competitions allowed me to hone my camera skills, exposure and scene understanding and quick decision making to get just about any shot in an instant.  Add to that an understanding of just about any breed of dog and how they jump, so that I could just about guarantee that I’d catch them in their best look, and I was in demand for dog sport photography.

The one missing element was the personal satisfaction that I was stretching myself creatively to a level that I felt I could.  I had joined a camera club and enjoyed the interaction with other photographers, and this did help me determine to some degree what I wanted to do as a next step.

My true desire was to be able to produce images of the quality that one would expect from a professional photographer; the kind of image that you see in a magazine or in advertising or in a gallery.

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Macaroni and Cheese

So I made a list of the skills that I needed:

  • Lighting a subject under various circumstances
  • A well-developed artistic eye
  • Ability to pose subjects for a pleasing result
  • Knowledge of tools to produce the final image

A pretty basic list, which can take thousands of hours to master.  Time to get serious about learning!

Learning approaches

In addition to the books that I already gathered, I started taking some workshops and seminars and participating in group shoots.  Each of these approaches had their merits and helped me learn in different ways.

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Solitude

On-line courses were great in terms of fitting into a hectic work week, and getting a lot of well-prepared technical or artistic information in written form for later reference; each course required me to submit assignment shots by a certain time, which were then critiqued by the instructor(s).  I took classes ranging from flash skills, conceptual photography (Solitude) and food photography (Macaroni and Cheese).  Food is definitely one area of commercial photography that I enjoy; after all, who doesn’t like food?

Workshops were fantastic opportunities to learn skills within a day or two and often get lots of hands-on work.  I worked with some great instructors, who are truly inspiring.  Rick Friedman’s workshops on Location Lighting taught me how to use Speedlights to light just about any situation creatively and for the effect that you want.  Bobbi Lane’s Portrait Photography workshops added a lot of portrait lighting for effect skill to my bag of tricks, as well as posing models.

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The Lady has Charm

Working with models was also crucial to my development as a photographer; even though most of my artistic work is landscape and abstract, working with models taught me to recognize the importance of managing lines in any shot.

What have I learnt?

Clearly, I have developed as a photographer over the past 10-12 years, and I have received recognition for a number of my images.  During that time, I have learned a lot of technical skills and unlocked some of my artistic ability, but more than anything I have achieved a level of confidence that allows me to take on just about any situation and come up with a solution for getting the shot that I want.

In the next part, I’ll go over some of the strategies that I use to get these images and what I see as the continuing journey of acquiring knowledge, skill and enjoyment from photography.

Hope to see you for that one!

Terraphilbious transports

I came across this word that I hadn’t seen before…

I came across this word that I hadn’t seen before today: terraphilbious.

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Terraphilbious Transport

Now, you’re probably saying the same thing that I did: I never heard that word before, but I could see this being an answer on Jeopardy!  Of course, I googled it right away and was astonished that I couldn’t find any hits on it.

I couldn’t get a definition in any on-line resource and it was not until I reached out to one of my British friends who has access to Robert Cawdrey‘s 1604 ‘A Table Alphabeticall‘ in the Oxford library that I got a reasonable definition.  For more information on this early dictionary, please check A Table Alphabeticall.

Terraphilbious is defined as that what loves life on land.  In the early Middle Ages it was used as a somewhat ironic reference to the smallish landing vehicles that were used by the Vikings and Normans during their conquering raids.

Of course, astute readers immediately recognize that this definition has been replaced by amphibious these days.  Part of the reason for this, my friend tells me, is that there was not enough love for life on land from most of the invading marauders to make the word believable.

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/play-lexicographer/

How did you learn photography? (part 2)

After a number of years without much photographic activity, the bug slowly started coming back during the mid to late 1990s

Early Renaissance

After a number of years without much photographic activity, the bug slowly started coming back during the mid to late 1990s.  The advent of the digital camera era got my curiosity aroused, but the high price of the cameras kept me off the playing field.  That is until Kodak came out with a reasonably priced 1MP camera, the DC20, which retailed for $299.  Yes, times have changed!

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Halloween 2000

The DC20 was capable of taking either 8 shots at full resolution or 16 at half resolution and had a fixed focal length lens.  To get the images off the camera required attaching it to a serial port and waiting for the bits to flow!  It was fun for experimenting and some very basic shots, but produced horrible artifacts.

The Olympus C960 (IIRC) came next in 2000 and it allowed me to start doing some actual photography with a digital camera, such as the Halloween shot of my daughter Teegan (left) and her friend.

During this time, the volume of my shooting went up dramatically, as the results were a bit more controllable and pleasing to the eye.  My education in photography was getting back on track, as I started paying closer attention to composition and light conditions; a lot of this was still trial and error, but if I look back at my images over these couple of years, there is a progression.

In 2003, I needed a camera upgrade and found the Minolta Dimage 7i, which was a big step up at 5 MP and much more control.  The improvement in image quality and the added control with the optical zoom enabled me to start exercising more control over the final look of the image.  This accelerated my learning and provided the stepping stone to the next level.

Going to the dogs

In 2004, my wife, Kris, started competing in agility with on of our Cardigan Welsh Corgis, Darwin.  Going with Kris to these competitions, I brought my trusty Minolta with me to get some shots of Darwin in action.  Of course, I would get in a couple of practice shots of other dogs, so that I had an idea what I could expect and where to get the best possible shot of Darwin.  And, because during these competitions most of your time is spent waiting for the next time Darwin gets to run the course, I got bored and started photographing other dogs’ runs.

Pretty soon, people started asking me, if I would consider selling the pictures I took of their dogs to them.  I wasn’t ready for that yet, particularly since my camera had a slight problem: shutter lag.  If you’re familiar with the Minolta Dimage 7i, you might know that there is about 1/3 second between pressing the shutter and image capture; not bad for photographing a posed group, but tricky when you try to get running dogs at just the right time.

You get the idea: upgrade time to my first Digital SLR, the Canon 10D.  This immediately solved the shutter lag problem and gave me full control over all the functions of the camera.  Now the learning had to go into high gear, as my plan was to pay for this camera with photo sales from agility competitions.  I convinced a couple of clubs to let me photograph their agility trials and found something out very quickly: people love photos of their dogs in action.

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Buford, Superdog

Looking back at the images from the first couple of trials, I have to admit that they were pretty rough.  The first step was to learn what the limits of my camera and lens were in terms of the exposure triangle.  Stopping motion of a dog in mid-flight requires a reasonably fast shutter speed.  And with this camera, I couldn’t push the ISO too high, as color cast would appear due to the graininess.

By early 2005, I had a decent handle on my camera and was able to produce shots, such as this Basset Hound doing a superdog flight over the final jump (there is a story behind this shot…).  The key learning piece was all about learning to master the equipment, so that to a casual observer it would simply look like all these shots required was a simple press of the shutter.  I learned to estimate exposure values, adjust for the difference in reflected light off different colors, compensate exposure depending on the color of the dog, and anticipate what the dog would do.

During this time, I did start buying photography books to accelerate my learning.  One of the books that I found invaluable is Brian Peterson’s Understanding Exposure, which covers much more than just exposure, as he spends quite a bit of time on composition as well.

What’s Next?

In terms of learning, photographing action was an excellent school, as the goal is to not miss any great shot and be prepared for anything.  I learned to shoot with both eyes open, as my non-dominant left eye can pick up on what is outside the right eye’s field of view through the lens.  I studied a tremendous amount about exposure, and learned how to look at a location to quickly analyze where the good vantage points are.

What was lacking from the dog-sport and other action photography was a sense of artistic expression.  The next step was to expand my range of photography and skills, so that I could take on new challenges.

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Rose Particle

In the next part, we’ll go over the range of skills and artistic expansion exercises that have led me to where I am today.  Hope you’re enjoying this little journey along my photographic path.