Friday Travel – vol 16

Fishing village of yore

Today, I thought I’d share a couple of travel photos from a trip to Nova Scotia about 10 years ago.  In particular, there’s a great little town called Peggy’s Cove, just a little south of Halifax that I want to share with you.

Peggys-Cove-Lighthouse_P2P9106
Lighthouse at Peggy’s Cove, N.S.

The classic red-and-white lighthouse is still operated by the Canadian Coast Guard, and is situated on an extensive granite outcrop at Peggy’s Point, immediately south of the village and its cove. This lighthouse is one of the most-photographed structures in Atlantic Canada and one of the most recognizable lighthouses in the world.

Visitors may explore the granite outcrop on Peggy’s Point around the lighthouse; despite numerous signs warning of unpredictable surf (including one on a bronze plaque on the lighthouse itself), several visitors each year are swept off the rocks by waves, sometimes drowning.

The first lighthouse at Peggy’s Cove was built in 1868 and was a wooden house with a beacon on the roof. At sundown the keeper lit a kerosene oil lamp magnified by a catoptric reflector (a silver-plated mirror) creating the red beacon light marking the eastern entrance to St. Margarets Bay. That lighthouse was replaced by the current structure, an octagonal lighthouse which was built in 1914. It is made of reinforced concrete but retains the eight-sided shape of earlier generations of wooden light towers. It stands almost 15 meters (49 ft) high. The old wooden lighthouse became the keeper’s dwelling and remained near to the current lighthouse until it was damaged by Hurricane Edna in 1954 and was removed. The lighthouse was automated in 1958. Since then, the red light was changed to white light, then to a green light in the late 1970s. Finally to conform to world standards the light was changed to red in 2007.

Nova-Scotia-Peggys-Cove-2007-07-09_P2P9146-update
View of the Cove

The first recorded name of the cove was Eastern Point Harbour or Pegg’s Harbour in 1766. The village is likely named after Saint Margaret’s Bay (Peggy being the nickname for Margaret), which Samuel de Champlain named after his mother Marguerite.  There has been much folklore created to explain the name. One story suggests the village may have been named after the wife of an early settler. The popular legend claims that the name came from the sole survivor of a shipwreck at Halibut Rock near the cove. Artist and resident William deGarthe said she was a young woman while others claim she was a little girl too young to remember her name and the family who adopted her called her Peggy.  The young shipwreck survivor married a resident of the cove in 1800 and became known as “Peggy of the Cove” attracting visitors from around the bay who eventually named the village, Peggy’s Cove, after her nickname.

Peggys-Cove-Boats_P2P9132
Fishing Boats

The village was formally founded in 1811 when the Province of Nova Scotia issued a land grant of more than 800 acres (320 ha) to six families of German descent. The settlers relied on fishing as the mainstay of their economy but also farmed where the soil was fertile. They used surrounding lands to pasture cattle. In the early 1900s the population peaked at about 300. The community supported a schoolhouse, church, general store, lobster cannery and boats of all sizes that were nestled in the Cove.

Many artists and photographers flocked to Peggy’s Cove. As roads improved, the number of tourists increased. Today the population is smaller but Peggy’s Cove remains an active fishing village and a favorite tourist destination.

Hope you enjoyed this little visit to Peggy’s Cove.

Technical Details

All images were captured with a Canon EOS 1D Mk II using an EF 24-105mm f/4 lens.

Author: jansenphoto

A Fresh Perspective Photography is more than just a vehicle for capturing the world around me; it provides me with a palette and a set of brushes, with which I paint not only what I see, but also look to express the emotions that are evoked by the scene in front of me in that moment. Growing up in the Netherlands exposed me to a wide cross-section of visual arts that laid the foundation of my photographic view of all that surrounds me. Early influences were the Dutch Masters of the 17th century, to whom I was introduced by my grandfather during museum explorations; favorites among them are the scenes of quotidian life depicted by Jan Steen and Frans Hals and the vivid landscapes of Jacob van Ruisdael. My classical high school education was supplemented by the Boijmans Van Beuningen museum, where I spent many a lunch hour exploring its great collection. Here I was introduced to surrealism with a particular love for the approach taken by Salvador Dali; Dali also rekindled my appreciation for the work of Hieronymus Bosch, who often showed the folly of us mortals. Universal Connections My approach to any photographic subject is to look for understanding first; in this I look to establish either a connection between the viewer and the subject or capture the connection of the subject with its surroundings. The captured image then aims to portray this connection from a perspective that is part of my personal interpretation. This interpretation is often a form of externalized introspection, which may alternately display the connection of isolated beings and items with their environment or highlight the whimsy of the profound world, in which we find ourselves. The universe is full of connections, many of which are waiting to be discovered; part of my journey as a photographer is to document these connections. Any assignment, be it an event, a product shoot or a portrait session is always approached through communication with the client; this is where the first connection is established. Ideas are exchanged and a collaborative plan of action forms, ultimately resulting in a set of images that aim to exceed the expectations of each client. And, lest we forget, it is important to have fun while practicing the serious business of photography!

16 thoughts on “Friday Travel – vol 16”

  1. I have a book in my head for the future. I have about 10 ahead of it, but the book is going to be from this area. I’m so glad I decided to click on your site today and found this info. Thanks for sharing. Very interesting. I wonder if I should name the girl Margaret or Peggy -could be interesting to make a twist there.
    fiddledeedeebooks.wordpress.ocm

    1. I think a book set in Nova Scotia can be nothing, but perfection! The character’s name is always a tricky thing, but I’d lean toward Margaret 🙂

      Be well,

      Frank

  2. This is really interesting, thank you Frank. 🙂 I love the story about Peggy and how she ended up in Peggy’s Cove! You have a lovely way of relaying the details of your trips and photos. Many blessings to you — Debbie ps: I am at a meditation retreat this weekend and will most likely be offline. Very much looking forward to it.

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