A Walk Through the Woods

Oxbow in Autumn

After a busy week and Saturday, I spent a little time this morning to catch up on some of the images from last weekend’s hike through the Oxbow National Wildlife Refuge.  It was my first attempt at doing some further exploration of this lovely wetlands area.  After doing a bit of research, I found that the primary purpose for which the Refuge was created is its “…particular value in carrying out the national migratory bird management program.”

The Refuge’s interspersion of wetland, forested upland and old field habitats is ideally suited for this purpose. The Refuge supports a diverse mix of migratory birds including waterfowl, wading birds, raptors, shorebirds, passerines, as well as resident mammals, reptiles, amphibians, fish and invertebrates. The extensive and regionally significant wetlands occurring on and adjacent to the Oxbow Refuge, including their associated tributary drainages and headwaters, have been listed as a priority for protection under both the North American Waterfowl Management Plan and the Emergency Wetlands Resources Act of 1986. The portion of the Oxbow NWR south of Route 2 lies within the 12,900-acre Central Nashua River Valley Area of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) designated by the Massachusetts Secretary of Environmental Affairs, and the portions of the Refuge north of Route 2 are included in the Squannassit ACEC due to the unique environmental characteristics and values of these wildlife habitats.
Here are some additional images from last weekend’s trek.

Color in the Pines

Even coniferous trees are showing the effect of the changing season, as some of the needles are withering on this pine in anticipation of dropping before Winter arrives.  Of course, we get to enjoy a soft bed under the tree from years of accumulated pine needles.

Leaves Preparing to Fall

As we look up to the sky, there is an interleaving pattern above us, showing the structure of individual leaves as they overlap with one another.The path is inviting, showing us the way betwixt ferns and trees with warm tones telling us of gentle strolls and comfortable temperatures.

Ancient Ferns

The persistent drought has caused these ferns to change from their familiar green to warm, yellowish tones.  Given the age of ferns, one cannot help but imagine what it would be like to be surrounded by a forest of them, listening for the stealthy approach of a flock of velociraptors… (luckily, no humanoids ever had that opportunity, except in Hollywood).

Swamp Construct

Nature has an uncanny way of presenting us with lines and colors that draw our eyes to them.  She never disappoints!

Technical Details

All images were captured with a Fujifilm X-T1

Author: jansenphoto

A Fresh Perspective Photography is more than just a vehicle for capturing the world around me; it provides me with a palette and a set of brushes, with which I paint not only what I see, but also look to express the emotions that are evoked by the scene in front of me in that moment. Growing up in the Netherlands exposed me to a wide cross-section of visual arts that laid the foundation of my photographic view of all that surrounds me. Early influences were the Dutch Masters of the 17th century, to whom I was introduced by my grandfather during museum explorations; favorites among them are the scenes of quotidian life depicted by Jan Steen and Frans Hals and the vivid landscapes of Jacob van Ruisdael. My classical high school education was supplemented by the Boijmans Van Beuningen museum, where I spent many a lunch hour exploring its great collection. Here I was introduced to surrealism with a particular love for the approach taken by Salvador Dali; Dali also rekindled my appreciation for the work of Hieronymus Bosch, who often showed the folly of us mortals. Universal Connections My approach to any photographic subject is to look for understanding first; in this I look to establish either a connection between the viewer and the subject or capture the connection of the subject with its surroundings. The captured image then aims to portray this connection from a perspective that is part of my personal interpretation. This interpretation is often a form of externalized introspection, which may alternately display the connection of isolated beings and items with their environment or highlight the whimsy of the profound world, in which we find ourselves. The universe is full of connections, many of which are waiting to be discovered; part of my journey as a photographer is to document these connections. Any assignment, be it an event, a product shoot or a portrait session is always approached through communication with the client; this is where the first connection is established. Ideas are exchanged and a collaborative plan of action forms, ultimately resulting in a set of images that aim to exceed the expectations of each client. And, lest we forget, it is important to have fun while practicing the serious business of photography!

8 thoughts on “A Walk Through the Woods”

  1. I have enjoyed looking at these photographs – I have a penchant for photographing leaves,so it is good to see someone else doing it as well as you have.

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