Tuesday Photo Challenge – Comfort

Tempt me with your comforts!

Welcome to Week 133 of the Tuesday Photo Challenge!

After a rather Slippery week of entries, I thought we’d need a bit of respite from all the slipping and sliding and settle in for a bit of Comfort!  As the weather is getting colder in New England and many other places in the Northern Hemisphere, the idea of a cozy comfortable spot by the fireplace is rather inviting.  This led me to this week’s theme, which I hope you will all be comfortable with handling!  Think about what denotes Comfort to you and how you would capture it in your mind’s eye, or with your camera’s lens.

Be mindful and creative, and let fun and comfort collide into an expose on the finer parts of our human condition!  I look forward to your creature comforts!!

Here’s some comfort food to get you going…

mac-n-cheese-121-8x10
Comfort food… You tempt me!

Macaroni and cheese is definitely one of my favorite comfort foods, as its cheesy, gooey goodness is just pleasing to the eye, nose and tongue!  Add some cubed ham and bake it in the oven and I won’t be late for dinner!!  I shot this image for a food photography class with the intent to create an image that would be at once inviting and give a sense of home-made comfort.  I did do a bit of food styling to get the look that I wanted (yes, there was a blowtorch involved 🙂 ).

The full rules of this challenge are in TPC Guidelines, but here’s the tl;dr:

  • Write a post with an image for this week’s topic
  • Please tag your post with fpj-photo-challenge (if you’re not sure about how tags work, please check out this WordPress article about tagging posts)
  • Create a pingback link to this post, so that I can create a post showing all of the submissions over the week (note: pingbacks may not appear immediately, as my site is set up to require approval for linking to it; helps against previous bad experiences with spamming)
  • Have fun creating something new (or sharing something old)!!

Can’t wait to see what comforts will be highlighted this week!!

For your enjoyment!

Mac and cheese!

The WordPress Daily Prompt has the theme of Flavorful.  Of course, there might be something good to eat somewhere!

A popular category of foods in the United States are those that are termed comfort foods; all the things that you want to eat with a bit of guilty pleasure, because you know that they are not necessarily the healthiest options, but they make you feel so good!  What this means varies from person to person, as we all have our individual tastes.

For me, the ultimate comfort food is a well-prepared macaroni and cheese….

Mac-N-Cheese-121-8x10
Stick a fork in it!

There is nothing like the gooey goodness of a delicious combination of cheeses, with a bit of crust from baking in the over, and the flavorful surprise of encountering a small cube of ham in your bite.  A guilty pleasure, yes; bring it on!!

What is your guilty pleasure?

WPC – Dinnertime

Warning: you may get hungry

This week’s theme for the DailyPost Weekly Photo Challenge is Dinnertime, which suits me just fine, albeit a bit restrictive, unless we all agree that we can have more than one dinner per day 🙂

Let’s start this week with some comfort food…

Mac-N-Cheese-121-8x10
Ready for dinner?

Pasta and cheese casseroles have been recorded as early as the 14th century in the Italian cookbook Liber de Coquina, one of the oldest medieval cookbooks, which featured a dish of parmesan and pasta. A cheese and pasta casserole known as makerouns was recorded in the famous medieval English cookbook, the Forme of Cury, which was also written in the 14th century. It was made with fresh, hand-cut pasta which was sandwiched between a mixture of melted butter and cheese. The recipe given (in Middle English) was “Take and make a thynne foyle of dowh. and kerve it on peces, and cast hem on boillyng water & seeþ it wele. take chese and grate it and butter cast bynethen and above as losyns. and serue forth.” (“Make a thin foil of dough and cut it in pieces. Put them in boiling in water and seethe them well. Grate cheese and add it with butter beneath and above as with losyns [a dish similar to lasagne], and serve.”)

The first modern recipe for the dish was included in cookery writer Elizabeth Raffald’s 1769 book, The Experienced English Housekeeper. Raffald’s recipe is for a Béchamel saucewith cheddar cheese—a Mornay sauce in French cooking—which is mixed with macaroni, sprinkled with Parmesan, and baked until bubbly and golden. The famous British Victorian cookbook Mrs Beeton’s Book of Household Management included two recipes for the dish. One recipe states that “The macaroni, (which should be “tender but perfectly firm, no part being allowed to melt, and the form entirely preserved” – lest one be tempted to cook it for so long it actually disintegrated) is then topped with more cheese, pepper and breadcrumbs, before receiving a final dose of melted butter for good measure and being placed before a “bright fire” to brown the crumbs, or grilled with a salamander broiler.

In the United Kingdom, during the 2010s, it has seen a surge in popularity, becoming widespread as a meal and as a side order in both fast food and upmarket restaurants

Now that you’re hungry…what is your favorite mac and cheese recipe?

Technical Details

This image was shot with my Canon EOS 5D Mk II with an EF 24-105mm f/4L lens.  Studio lights were used to get the specific look that I was after.

Inspired by Daily Post Weekly Photo Challenge – Dinnertime