Friday’s Mystery Slide

What kind of gas do we have here?

Today, I want to start something a little different: present you with a mystery.  Not a deep, dark mystery to be sure, but, rather, something from the past that may interest both young and old.

20160218-Slides-image028
Holy Gasbag! What do we have here?

This image is a scan from a slide, that was not taken by me; I came upon a collection of slides that my father-in-law was going to throw out (they were wrapped up neatly in a paper towel with tape marked trash on them).

Luckily, he was nice enough to check and see, if I wanted the containers that they were stored in, so I asked him, if I could have the slides too.  He kind of shrugged and said, “Sure”.

This was a couple of years ago and I promptly bought a slide scanner, but never touched them until this week.  After getting a new driver for the scanner from the manufacturer in Taiwan, I fired it up last night and let it scan the first 36 slides.

That is when I noticed this slide that I present to you as a mystery.  What do you make of it?  What is this location?  What is its purpose?

Hope you enjoy this little mystery.  If you do, I may bring out more slides from this collection.  I’m curious to see what all of you can bring to the light.

Author: jansenphoto

A Fresh Perspective Photography is more than just a vehicle for capturing the world around me; it provides me with a palette and a set of brushes, with which I paint not only what I see, but also look to express the emotions that are evoked by the scene in front of me in that moment. Growing up in the Netherlands exposed me to a wide cross-section of visual arts that laid the foundation of my photographic view of all that surrounds me. Early influences were the Dutch Masters of the 17th century, to whom I was introduced by my grandfather during museum explorations; favorites among them are the scenes of quotidian life depicted by Jan Steen and Frans Hals and the vivid landscapes of Jacob van Ruisdael. My classical high school education was supplemented by the Boijmans Van Beuningen museum, where I spent many a lunch hour exploring its great collection. Here I was introduced to surrealism with a particular love for the approach taken by Salvador Dali; Dali also rekindled my appreciation for the work of Hieronymus Bosch, who often showed the folly of us mortals. Universal Connections My approach to any photographic subject is to look for understanding first; in this I look to establish either a connection between the viewer and the subject or capture the connection of the subject with its surroundings. The captured image then aims to portray this connection from a perspective that is part of my personal interpretation. This interpretation is often a form of externalized introspection, which may alternately display the connection of isolated beings and items with their environment or highlight the whimsy of the profound world, in which we find ourselves. The universe is full of connections, many of which are waiting to be discovered; part of my journey as a photographer is to document these connections. Any assignment, be it an event, a product shoot or a portrait session is always approached through communication with the client; this is where the first connection is established. Ideas are exchanged and a collaborative plan of action forms, ultimately resulting in a set of images that aim to exceed the expectations of each client. And, lest we forget, it is important to have fun while practicing the serious business of photography!

16 thoughts on “Friday’s Mystery Slide”

      1. As an architect, I would humbly add that this form would need some windows. Architects too, like natural light and pleasant views! I say that the form is perhaps an alien vessel from a distant galaxy…!!

      2. I defer to your superior architectural skills, as I have never design a bucky-dome, so don’t know where the windows go…

        Your guess for this mysterious entity is interesting!!

  1. I would say that is a satellite radio relay station.
    Or a satellite tracking station.
    We have several in the New England area. The dome protections the antennas from the elements.

  2. I love mysteries,and architecture, so I’m totally into this!
    This is The Telstar Radome,in Andover,Maine. Built in 1961.An identical twin Radome was built in France.The Andover Earth Station was equipped with a giant horn antenna, 7 stories high and weighing 340 tons. To protect it from bad weather, a radome made of Dacron covered the antenna.
    You were also smart by mentioning Buckminster Fuller since He’s the one responsible for concept of “Spaceship Earth “& geodesic dome.I have seen many domical structures like this in Kuwait but of different function, more on a reflective skylights.

    I’m already looking forward for the next slide!

    1. WOW!! You clearly know your Radomes!! You are spot on with your information.

      This slide was shot in 1962, and I loved it right away for its combination of cars from the period and the space-age design, which also reflects some of the design ideas in the cars.

      I’ve been a fan of Buckminster Fuller’s work for a long time; architecture, as my good friend George knows, is one of the areas that I truly admire, particularly modern architecture.

      Glad you enjoyed it!!

  3. That was great that “justbluedutch” knew actually what it was, clearing up the mystery, very interesting had no idea what is was.
    You come up with some very nice pictures. Thanks for sharing.

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