Tuesday Photo Challenge – Ancient

From a distant past…

Welcome to week 163 of the Tuesday Photo Challenge!

After a week of wonderful Tower posts, I thought it might be nice to take a step back into time. The theme of this week is inspired by our vacation in Ireland, as in many locations one felt the gentle tug of days gone by, telling of a time that was very different. With that in mind, your challenge is to portray that which connects you to all things Ancient. As usual, there are many ways to approach the Ancient (I’ll even take Ancient Aliens!), so I’m sure that your creative minds will come up with something interesting!

Have some fun with this theme and don’t let the dust of the ancient settle on you!

This is one of the images that inspired this theme…

Looking into the Oratory

This view looks into the Oratory of the Innisfallen Monastery, which sits on Innisfallen Island in Loch Leane. We reached it by small boat, which allowed us time on the island to explore the old abbey and this oratory. The abbey on the island dates to the 7th century with the current visible structures ranging from the 10th to 13th century. This oratory hails from the 12th century.

What struck me about this view is that I could feel the past pulling me back in, which gave me a sense of what it was like to sit in quiet contemplation in this small chapel hundreds of years ago…

The full rules of this challenge are in TPC Guidelines, but here’s the tl;dr:

  • Write a post with an image for this week’s topic
  • Please tag your post with fpj-photo-challenge (if you’re not sure about how tags work, please check out this WordPress article about tagging posts)
  • Create a pingback link to this post, so that I can create a post showing all of the submissions over the week (note: pingbacks may not appear immediately, as my site is set up to require approval for linking to it; helps against previous bad experiences with spamming)
  • Have fun creating something new (or sharing something old)!!

Do the ancients proud and come up with a novel entry!

Author: jansenphoto

A Fresh Perspective Photography is more than just a vehicle for capturing the world around me; it provides me with a palette and a set of brushes, with which I paint not only what I see, but also look to express the emotions that are evoked by the scene in front of me in that moment. Growing up in the Netherlands exposed me to a wide cross-section of visual arts that laid the foundation of my photographic view of all that surrounds me. Early influences were the Dutch Masters of the 17th century, to whom I was introduced by my grandfather during museum explorations; favorites among them are the scenes of quotidian life depicted by Jan Steen and Frans Hals and the vivid landscapes of Jacob van Ruisdael. My classical high school education was supplemented by the Boijmans Van Beuningen museum, where I spent many a lunch hour exploring its great collection. Here I was introduced to surrealism with a particular love for the approach taken by Salvador Dali; Dali also rekindled my appreciation for the work of Hieronymus Bosch, who often showed the folly of us mortals. Universal Connections My approach to any photographic subject is to look for understanding first; in this I look to establish either a connection between the viewer and the subject or capture the connection of the subject with its surroundings. The captured image then aims to portray this connection from a perspective that is part of my personal interpretation. This interpretation is often a form of externalized introspection, which may alternately display the connection of isolated beings and items with their environment or highlight the whimsy of the profound world, in which we find ourselves. The universe is full of connections, many of which are waiting to be discovered; part of my journey as a photographer is to document these connections. Any assignment, be it an event, a product shoot or a portrait session is always approached through communication with the client; this is where the first connection is established. Ideas are exchanged and a collaborative plan of action forms, ultimately resulting in a set of images that aim to exceed the expectations of each client. And, lest we forget, it is important to have fun while practicing the serious business of photography!

90 thoughts on “Tuesday Photo Challenge – Ancient”

    1. The building is not round. It’s a small chapel with the roof missing due to the years of dilapidation. Cathbad the Druid sounds like an interesting character!

      1. CATHBAD FEATURES IN THE ‘ELLIE GRIFFIFS’ BOOKS. HE IS A PROFESSOR AT THE UNIVERSITY IN NORFOLK DURING THE DAY AND A DRUID BE NIGHT.SHE IS A PATHOLOGIST AND ASKS HIS ADVICE ON CRIMES WHERE THE ACCULT IS INVOLVED. CHINA
        my comment was not to be taken seriously, Frank.

    1. Thank you so much! The whole concept of monks retreating to a small island in a large lake for solitude and contemplation really speaks to me.

      I love your tale of the olive press!!

      1. Yes, I think it speaks to me on some level, too (not the organized religion bit of it so much as the being connected to nature and living a simple life near the ocean).
        As for the olive press — another bit of trivia is that one of my sisters has an olive grove and someone in her small town has an olive press that works very much like the traditional one. They make fantastic extra virgin olive oil. My grocer in NYC, who operates the store with his brother, have a family olive grove in Greece, and they bring over their very own fresh-pressed olive oil and sell it in their neighborhood store. Small scale, fab taste. I’m spoiled. 🙂

    1. I enjoyed reading that. The oldest thing I own is my college alarm clock. I’m happy you have Grandad.

      I may have to stretch the definition of ancient for this challenge.

      1. 🙂 I found some in New England in places that most people aren’t aware of in the area. There are interesting old things in lots of places.

      2. Unfortunately old doesn’t mean ancient. I discussed the word and it’s meaning with local historians who agreed that, save for the very rock under my feet, there is nothing in “new” jersey that fits the definition of ancient.

      1. My pleasure 😀 I’m glad that you like the post. Angkor is a really special place. I always wonder how people at that time could build such complex, long-lasting structures. And it’s middle of a jungle.

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