Three Line Tales – Week 14

Light and dark

Welcome to Week Fourteen of Three Line Tales.

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TLT 14 photo by Fabio Rose – click here for full res pic 

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Shadowy concepts,
Brilliant intuitive thoughts.
Bicameral mind.

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Thank you to Sonya of Only 100 Words for coming up with Three Line Tales.

The TLT rules are simple:

  • Take a look at the photo prompt and write three lines to go with it.
  • Your lines can be poetry, micro-fiction, micro non-fiction or just a really long caption – everything goes as long as it’s three lines long.
  • A link back to this post would be nice (it’ll make me feel obliged to swing by yours to read your three lines, and some of your readers might want to join in, too – the more, the merrier, right?).
  • Tag your post with 3LineTales – it’ll make it easier for others to find it in the Reader.
  • Read other participants’ lines.

Please check Sonya’s post Three Line Tales Detailed Instructions for the full explanation.

Hope you enjoyed this

Daily Prompt – Hope

Gather hope and enter!

Looking at the WordPress Daily Post this morning, I was a bit amused that the day after using the prompt of ‘Abandoned’, they chose to use ‘Hope’.   Of course, the combination of these two words is referenced most often in the line from the first part of Dante’s Divine Comedy, Inferno, “Lasciate ogne speranza, voi ch’intrate“, which are the words written over the gate to Hell.

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Pyroplasm 3x

The logical connection between these consecutive Daily Prompts led me immediately to an image that still speaks to me after a number of years: Pyroplasm 3x.  Although, to me, the fires in this image are the fires of creation rather than destruction; one could almost paraphrase Dante’s words and say: “Embrace all hope, ye who pass through here!“, as the end result is new creation!

Hope you enjoy this image!

Technical Details

This was shot completely in-camera using a Canon EOS 1D MkIII and an EF 24-105mm f/4L lens.  Using aperture priority, I got the shutter speed slowed to just about 1.5 seconds for this shot while doing a slow zoom with the lens.

Inspired  by Daily Prompt – Hope.

Wednesday Wonderment – pt 15

Out of a small blossom…

On this Wednesday, l’m focusing on one of my favorite kind of trees: Apple!  As I followed an apple orchard in a past year, it really gave me appreciation for what happens every year.

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It’s Spring!

These beautiful blossoms will soon wither and start their transformation into what will at first be tiny little nodules, which will grow into full size apples during the Summer season.

What natural processes leave you filled with Wonderment?

Technical Details

This image was shot with a Canon EOS 5D Mk III with an EF 100mm f/2.8 lens.  Exposure settings were 1/200 second at f/11 and 640 ISO.

Daily Prompt – Abandoned

The plight of the lachrimose

As I saw today’s Daily Prompt of ‘Abandoned’, I immediately thought of an image from a couple of years ago…

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The Lonely Onion

This poor onion had been left all alone in the icy parking lot of a pizzeria.  Had it tried to escape being taken apart by a sharp knife on a food preparation table?  Or had it been evicted from the premises after a tearful goodbye?

Unfortunately, the onion declined to comment, so I will never know the answer.

Hope you enjoy this image!

Technical Details

This image was captured with an iPhone 5S using the standard Camera app.

Inspired  by Daily Prompt – Abandoned.

Tuesday Photo Challenge – Different View

Which angle works for you?

In the third installment of this series, let’s take yet another look at the world around us and see, if we can find a ‘Different View’; something that we may not notice in our daily wandering on this little, blue planet.

This past weekend, I decided to accompany my wife for herding practice with our youngest dog, and brought my camera with me for some exploring, which led to this view for inspiration…

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Fence Tunnel

For those who’d like to participate in this weekly challenge, the rules are the following:

  • Write a post with an image for this week’s topic
  • Please use the tag #fpj-photo-challenge
  • Create a pingback link to this post, so that I can create a post showing all of the submissions over the week
  • Have fun creating something new!!

I’m looking forward to seeing your creative efforts!

Technical Details

This photo was taken with a Canon EOS 5D Mk III using a EF 100mm f/2.8 macro lens.  Exposure was at f/11 and 1/60 second at 640 ISO.

Stories of the Zuiderzee

Scheepjongens van Bontekoe

Growing up in the Netherlands, one cannot help but be drawn to the water that surrounds you everywhere you go; as you may know, much of the country is below sea level, which is only possibly through a system of dikes and managing the water level with great care.

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Eel Fisherman in Volendam

As my mother’s family hails from the town of Hoorn in the province of North Holland, I spent quite a bit of time in that town visiting my great-grandmother during Summer during my early years.  These times were magical, as I heard the tales of her youth and also traversed the town and its annual fair with my great-uncle, which was always a lot of fun.  As a result of these wonderful times, I have always been drawn to Hoorn and the towns, such as Volendam, of the Zuiderzee, as the Ijsselmeer used to be known, and its storied history.

Founded in 716, Hoorn rapidly grew to become a major harbor town. During Holland’s ‘Golden Age’ (or ‘Golden Century’), Hoorn was an important home base for the Dutch East India Company (VOC) and a very prosperous centre of trade. The Hoorn fleet plied the seven seas and returned laden with precious commodities. Exotic spices such as pepper, nutmeg, cloves, and mace were sold at vast profits. With their skill in trade and seafaring, sons of Hoorn established the town’s name far and wide. Jan Pieterszoon Coen (1587–1629) is famous for his violent raids in Dutch Indies (now Indonesia), where he “founded” the city of Batavia in 1619 (now Jakarta). He has a big statue on the Rode Steen square in the center of Hoorn.

In 1618, Willem Bontekoe (1587–1657) undertook his first and only voyage for the VOC. His story of his travel and hardship found its way into the history books when he published his adventures in 1646 under the title Journael ofte gedenckwaerdige beschrijvinge van de Oost-Indische reyse van Willem Ysbrantsz. Bontekoe van Hoorn, begrijpende veel wonderlijcke en gevaerlijcke saecken hem daer in wedervaren (‘Journal, or memorable description, of the East-Indian voyage of Willem Ysbrantz. Bontekoe of Hoorn, comprising many wondrous and dangerous things experienced by him’). In 1616, the explorer Willem Corneliszoon Schouten braved furious storms as he rounded the southernmost tip of South America. He named it Kaap Hoorn (Cape Horn) in honour of his home town.

The Zuiderzee (now Ijsselmeer)

In classical times there was already a body of water in this location, called Lacus Flevo by Roman authors. It was much smaller than its later forms and its connection to the main sea was much narrower; it may have been a complex of lakes and marshes and channels, rather than one lake. Over time these lakes gradually eroded their soft peat shores and spread (a process known as waterwolf). Some part of this area of water was later called the Vlie; it probably flowed into the sea through what is now the Vliestroom channel between the islands of Vlieland and Terschelling. The Marsdiep was once a river (fluvium Maresdeop) which may have been a distributary of the Vlie. During the early Middle Ages this began to change as rising sea levels and storms started to eat away at the coastal areas which consisted mainly of peatlands. In this period the inlet was referred to as the Almere, indicating it was still more of a lake, but the mouth and size of the inlet were much widened in the 12th century and especially after a disastrous flood in 1282  broke through the barrier dunes near Texel. The disaster marked the rise of Amsterdam on the southwestern end of the bay, since seagoing traffic of the Baltic trade could now visit. The even more massive St. Lucia’s flood occurred 14 December 1287, when the seawalls broke during a storm, killing approximately 50,000 to 80,000 people in the fifth largest flood in recorded history. The name “Zuiderzee” came into general usage around this period.

The size of this inland sea remained largely stable from the 15th century onwards due to improvements in dikes, but when storms pushed North Sea water into the inlet, the Zuiderzee became a volatile cauldron of water, frequently resulting in flooding and the loss of ships. For example, on 18 November 1421, a seawall at the Zuiderzee dike broke, which flooded 72 villages and killed about 10,000 people. This was the Second St. Elizabeth’s Flood: see Sint-Elisabethsvloed (1421).

Hope you enjoyed a little bit of history on this fine Monday!