Tuesday Photo Challenge – Round Up 173

Locks of all sizes!

Welcome to the 173rd round up of the Tuesday Photo Challenge!

All of you certainly had a Lock on this week’s theme! Your posts were filled with creative approaches to the theme and there were a couple that really surprised me with novel interpretations. Some of what you shared in your posts were personal moments of joy and there were some deep interpretations that really made me think and appreciate your thinking!

Overall, I couldn’t be happier than with this great set of posts and the work that you put into it. Thank you very much!!

Here’s a pretty sizable lock…

Falkirk Wheel in Action

The Falkirk Wheel is a one-of-a-kind lock that connects the Forth and Clyde Canal to the Union Canal, raising, or lowering, boats by 24 meters; the Wheel replaces 11 locks in this connection, thus making the trip significantly faster. The operation of the lock is based on Archimedes’ Principle.

Please enjoy the following blog posts:

  1. Jez kicks things off with a lock that had not cross my mind in his post in Jez Braithwaite; that zoom lock really comes in handy from time to time!
  2. This week we go to Derinkuyu in Don’t Hold Your Breath, which has some astonishing areas to explore, which include a lock…
  3. Shelley wonders if vacation is like getting a new battery in another wonderful post in Quaint Revival; you be the judge, if she has a lock on this subject!
  4. Brian is negotiating in a fantastic post in Bushboy’s World; the Canal St. Martin is truly lovely!
  5. Michelle definitely closed the theme beautifully in her post in Take a Walk… and Discover!
  6. The stables are locked, as we can see in the stunning photograph in the post in theOnlyD800intheHameau; it looks like the horses had a nice place to stay in the Chateau de la Riviére in Pompadour.
  7. Na’ama really identified the dark side of the lock in her post in Na’ama Yehuda: both for animals and humans the lock can be used against us…
  8. Judy puts together a gorgeous set of images in lifelessons, where the locks come in interesting varieties!
  9. Debbie takes us to Sotland in her post Travel with Intent, where we don’t want to get locked up in Edinburgh Castle. In a second post in Travel with Intent, Debbie shares a stunning view of the Falkirk Wheel!
  10. I fully expected that there would be no shortage of locks to choose from in pensivity101‘s post, and they are indeed stunning!
  11. The photographs of locks in Chateaux des Fleurs are truly stunning! Beautifully shot!
  12. This week in The Jesh Studio, we are treated to a wonderful variety of images and a lock that doesn’t look to be that strong…
  13. Danny’s photo in Danny James Photography is fantastic, and really captures an intense set of locks!
  14. Jase has another awesome post in Proscenium, which locks into the right tee!
  15. The locks that are captured in Geriatri’x’ Fotogallery are stunning; those Teutonic Knights knew how to build them!
  16. Jackie found some great locations for locks in her post in Junk Boat Travels, which are a joy to behold!
  17. Tatiana gives us an amazing close-up view of the Miraflores Locks in her post in Travelways; the Panama Canal is still a wonder!
  18. In a very cool post in iBallrtw, we get another view of the locks in Canal Saint Martin in Paris and a shoutout to Busboy’s World!
  19. Ken has a lock on love in his blog Pictures without Film; there are some serious locks in Llansteffan Castle!
  20. Maria captured a wonderful bridge in Vilnius in the post in her blog Kamerapromenader! Love is alive and well in Vilnius!
  21. Woolly shows us that love locks are ubiquitous in his post in Woolly Muses, as we see them in Salzburg…
  22. Alice brings us a wonderful shot of Lock 35 in the Erie Canal in her blog the 59 Club.
  23. Carol brings us proof that Paris is truly the city for lovers in a wonderful post in Light Words!
  24. Viveka brings us some gorgeous photos of locks in her post in MyGuiltyPleasures; and the quote by Sarah Dressen is truly appropriate!
  25. In a truly wonderful post in A Day In The Life, we can wonder about love lost, or locked…
  26. Deb captures a lovely scene in her post in Twenty-Four; the lock and weir are stunning!
  27. Cee’s has a fantastic variety of locks in her post in Cee’s Photography, among which I like those curly locks the best!
  28. Susan has an extremely stylish lock in her post in Musin’ with Susan, which also has an amazing history! Also, go check out Susan’s week in review in Musin’ with Susan!
  29. Khürt brings us a couple of stunning posts; the first one in Island on the Net brings us the Kingston Locks on the Delaware and Raritan canal; the second one in Island on the Net shows off the Griggstown Locks on the same canal. These are fantastic documentary posts!
  30. David takes a retro approach in his post in David M’s Photoblog; the resultant image is fantastic!
  31. In a great photo in Land of Images we get to see a classic wooden pair of locks!
  32. In a really wonderful post in Travel with Tech, we get to see a report on love locks in Prague; stunning photos!
  33. Teressa rummaged through her random item drawer to find lots of lock that we get to see in her post in Another LQQK; awesome post!
  34. Elizabeth features a great selection of locks around the world in her blog AlBatz Adventures; they are amazing!
  35. John and Karen share their special moment in Budapest in their blog, JKRoaming; go read this amazing post!
  36. We get to experience an unusual lock in Heart 2 Heart, as it is from the land of Bhutan; great craftsmanship!
  37. The story of a trunk makes a great post in One Letter Up – Diary 2.0; it’s amazing how something as basic as a trunk can make it from generation to generation!

Please let all of these great bloggers know your thoughts about their posts!

Author: jansenphoto

A Fresh Perspective Photography is more than just a vehicle for capturing the world around me; it provides me with a palette and a set of brushes, with which I paint not only what I see, but also look to express the emotions that are evoked by the scene in front of me in that moment. Growing up in the Netherlands exposed me to a wide cross-section of visual arts that laid the foundation of my photographic view of all that surrounds me. Early influences were the Dutch Masters of the 17th century, to whom I was introduced by my grandfather during museum explorations; favorites among them are the scenes of quotidian life depicted by Jan Steen and Frans Hals and the vivid landscapes of Jacob van Ruisdael. My classical high school education was supplemented by the Boijmans Van Beuningen museum, where I spent many a lunch hour exploring its great collection. Here I was introduced to surrealism with a particular love for the approach taken by Salvador Dali; Dali also rekindled my appreciation for the work of Hieronymus Bosch, who often showed the folly of us mortals. Universal Connections My approach to any photographic subject is to look for understanding first; in this I look to establish either a connection between the viewer and the subject or capture the connection of the subject with its surroundings. The captured image then aims to portray this connection from a perspective that is part of my personal interpretation. This interpretation is often a form of externalized introspection, which may alternately display the connection of isolated beings and items with their environment or highlight the whimsy of the profound world, in which we find ourselves. The universe is full of connections, many of which are waiting to be discovered; part of my journey as a photographer is to document these connections. Any assignment, be it an event, a product shoot or a portrait session is always approached through communication with the client; this is where the first connection is established. Ideas are exchanged and a collaborative plan of action forms, ultimately resulting in a set of images that aim to exceed the expectations of each client. And, lest we forget, it is important to have fun while practicing the serious business of photography!

11 thoughts on “Tuesday Photo Challenge – Round Up 173”

  1. We would have loved to use the Falkirk Wheel when we had the boat, but it was not to be as we didn’t explore the canals as much as we wanted to. Another great selection of contributors Frank.

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