When you’re not happy with a photo…

If at first you don’t like it…

I expect that I am pretty much like most people, when it comes to photography:

  • Not every shot is perfect, and I can always find some flaw with it!
  • What I have in mind for a shot doesn’t always show up in my camera…
  • My best shot is the one that got away!

If this sounds familiar, this post is for you!

The date is July 6, 2007. My wife and I are in Nova Scotia, where she’s competing in an international agility trial with our Cardigan Welsh Corgis. I drop her off in the mornings, after which I go exploring with my FJ Cruiser for things to see, experience and photograph.  In the latter parts of the morning, I arrive in the little town of Digby and decide to stretch my legs and see what I can find.

At the end of Water Street, I see that the tide is out, so I clamber down to the beach and see the fog hanging over the bay.

Underwhelming Vista

Trust me, when I tell you that is was an awe inspiring view! I was happy that I caught the Bay of Fundy at low tide, as the dock shows the high water mark pretty well!  Was I impressed with my work? Not really… This image wound up being one among many taken in Nova Scotia, most of which were more exciting than this one.

This photo remained in the dustbin of my storage until almost 7 years after I took it.  In 2014, I was perusing some of my past photos, as I was reorganizing my storage, and I chanced upon this photo.  By that time, I had done quite a bit of work creating HDR images and really wished that I’d taken a set of exposures instead of a single shot when I looked at this file.

With 5 exposures or even 3, I knew that I could make something out of this scene.  But, what if…  HDRsoft’s Photomatix Pro has the ability to generate a 1-shot HDR image, which I really hadn’t attempted before.  On a lark, I decided to try it on this image.

Bay of Fundy

After the 1-shot processing, I used the tone mapping capabilities of Photomatix Pro to create the slightly more dramatic image that you see here.  Of course, looking at it now, I see many flaws with the processing, which makes me want to redo the process and create something even better.

If I can restrain myself from doing just that, I might get to some of my many travel photos from various years, as I’m at least 7 years behind schedule!

The moral of this story is to give your throwaway images another look and think what possibilities exist…

Changing Times

Seasons and industry

The WordPress Daily Photo Challenge provides the theme of Transformation.

In yesterday’s post, I mentioned the change of the seasons; today, another area of transformation.

In New England, one of the changes we see in many towns is that transformation of industry across the last century or two. Mills were built everywhere during the 19th century, using the power of the water that was available in many locations.  However, as the 20th century changed the main source of power from water and steam to electrically driven manufacturing, locations of the mills would change. As a result, many of the bustling mills were abandoned and many towns faltered.

Here’s a look back into the 19th century…

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Mills on the Connecticut River

The good news is that many of these classic buildings are being repurposed as office space, living space and some new manufacturing. This type of reuse is fantastic to see!

Have a wonderful day!

Succumb to Decay?

Advancements cause decay…

The WordPress Daily Prompt has the theme of Succumb.  While there are many ways to approach this prompt, the one that came to me first is to document the ongoing decay and how it threatens to the buildings that once were the backbone of a vibrant community.

The village of Turners Falls was established as a planned industrial community based on the ability to harness the power of the Connecticut river by building a dam and power canal to drive industry.  As the power canal still rushes through the town, one can imagine the din of that era, as mills next to the canal were actively producing their goods.  As with many of these towns, industrialization slowly moved away from them, as water power was replaced by fossil fuels, causing the town to succumb to slow decay.

These days, Turners Falls is a charming little town to visit with an interesting historic district.

One of the old mill buildings along Powers Street…

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Powers Street Decay

As you can see in this image, this mill building was already in an advanced state of decrepitude, as the window on the right side shows the sky behind it.  I’m not sure, if the building still stands, but it called from a past era on this autumn day!

Have a wonderful day!

Reflections of Note

Sky’s reflections!

Well, am I pleased that this week’s WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge happens to be on the theme of Reflecting?  Yes, I am!!

The only problem that I have with this topic is to decide which ones of my images to select, as I have a fair amount of photographs that use a reflection.  So I may do a number of posts, upon which we can reflect.

The first contribution is one of my favorite HDR images…

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Water and Sky

This image came about a number of years back, when I was photographing an agility event in Skowhegan, Maine.  As we were done around mid-afternoon, and I had noticed that there were some nice skies, this spot came to mind for photographing.  It is the hydroelectric facility in the middle of the town, where the Kennebec river flows through it.

Enjoy!

 

The Craft Rest…

With today’s WordPress Daily Post prompt of Craft, my first thought was certainly one of talking about the craft of photography, but as I looked for an image to go with that I came across different craft!

As a matter of fact, this image works well with both aspects of the word, as my photo of these craft on the beach during low tide on the Bay of Fundy had originally failed to impress me enough to make it part of my regular rotation of images that I didn’t mind displaying.  When I captured it, the weather was kind of overcast with a low cloud cover and lots of gray tones.  I decided to take the shot anyway, as the contrast between the height of the pier and the boats on the beach was so striking.

Craft at the Bay of Fundy

It wasn’t until several years later that I decided to try some different processing of this image.  Using HDRsoft’s Photomatix Pro, I tried some different processing to get the sky to speak a bit more… and I like the end result.  Of course, I also realized that I should have shot this as a 3 or 5-shot HDR series 🙂

Do you ever have a photo that you breathed new life in with a bit of processing?

Heading to the Exit

There are times when we hope that we are truly alone, but not quite sure.  Times of incertitude, out of our familiar surroundings, a bit lost and not quite sure where we will be safe again.  Our senses tell us that there is someone out there, or is it something?  Ahead, in the distance, there appears to be sunlight and green, safety!  Shall we risk moving toward it?

Gauntlet

This image was captured at the farm of the Westborough State Hospital, here in Massachusetts.  This dilapidated area was filled with textures and feelings of what transpired in a past filled with people and animals…

Inspired by the WordPress Daily Post Photo Challenge of Solitude.

Warped Wednesday – pt. 4

Ghost ships on the water…

Part of my thinking behind this series of posts is to get a bit of feedback from all of the readers, which should help me formulate a crisper view on my photography.  It’s been very heartening to see your thoughts on some of my abstract images, so I thought I’d also mix something a little different in this week.

As the Tuesday Photo Challenge has the theme of Abandoned, this week’s Warped Wednesday image kind of fits pretty well…

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Flying Dutchman

This is an image that I took during a bit of urban exploration a number of years ago in Westborough, Massachusetts.  This is inside the farm that was part of the state hospital (I say was, as this building has been razed).

When I chanced upon this interior, I immediately had a sense of being inside the hold of a ghost ship, devoid of life and stripped bare; somewhere, there was the foreboding that all could come back in an instant: crew, canons and full ship to ship combat.

That’s why I decided on a 5 shot HDR series that I processed in a rather stark fashion, using a grungy look to get the desired effect.

I’m curious to find out how this image speaks to you.