Friday Travel Photo – vol 7

Stark beauty

Back to Iceland to vist one of the really impressive areas with geothermal activity that gives you an idea of the power of the planet: Hverarönd.

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Hverarönd Geothermal

 

When I walked toward this geothermal area in northern Iceland, the first thing that struck me is the smell of sulphurdioxide: rotten eggs!  With the barren landscape, its steam vents, the hissing of the escaping steam and the bouquet, it gives one the sense of walking into a landscape that would have been fitting for Hieronymus Bosch.

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Hverarönd: sulphur deposits

I could appreciate that people might have horrific fantasies of demons and trolls popping up from this landscape.

At the same time, one has to appreciate the beauty of this barren landscape, its colors and amazing contrasts.

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Hverarönd: Warm running water

Take a tour up north, the next time you’re in Iceland and go explore Hverarönd and the Myvatn area, as the landscape lover in you will not be disappointed!

Technical Details

Each of these images was captured with my Canon EOS 5D Mk III using an EF 17-40mm f/4L lens with a circular polarizer (hence the saturated sky).  Various exposure settings were used with an eye towards keeping adequate depth of field.

Friday Travel Photos – vol 5

Catch of the day!

This week’s stop is in Iceland, where I made an all too short, 4-day stop last year on the way back from Europe.  This country is full of photogenic spots, all deserving time to be explored and presented.

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Herring Barrels

These images are from the Herring Era Museum in Siglufjörður, a small town on one of the numerous fjords on the Northern coast of Iceland.  It is one of the many towns, villages and areas along the north and east coast of Iceland that were deeply affected by the arrival of the herring adventure around the beginning of the 20th century.

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Pickling the herring catch

Nowhere did the herring adventure have such an impact as in Siglufjörður. Norwegian fishermen came sailing on their herring vessels during the summer of 1903, and thereby the Herring Adventure had started. Within forty years this once tiny little village had transformed into a thriving town of more than three thousand inhabitants.

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Whalebone and museum view

For years the entire life of Siglufjörður centred on the herring catch and its processing – the town’s twenty-three salting stations and five reducing factories were a living reminder of that. Siglufjörður was also one of the most important ports in Iceland and on more than one occasion the herring exported from the town accounted for over 20% of the nation’s total exports.

As the herring adventure progressed, a goldrush-like atmosphere settled over the town, leading to Siglufjörður been dubbed the “Atlantic Klondike”. The town also became a magnet for herring speculators who came and went, some making a lot of money during the stay, and others not. With its booming industry, Siglufjörður also became a mecca for tens of thousands of workers and labourers seeking employment.

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A bit of local feel

When bad weather and storms broke, the sheltered waters of the fjord became home to a massed fleet of hundreds of herring ships. Life on land was just as colourful, the streets of Siglufjörður so jammed with crowds and activities that they resembled the teeming avenues of major cities.

Marine resources are notoriously unstable, and herring is no exception. Following depressed catch figures in the years around 1950, herring stocks began to be fished as never before. This was due to a new and more efficient fishing technology developed by Icelandic pioneers. Other countries were quick in claiming these advances for themselves.

The years that followed continued to underscore the decline of catches and fortunes in Siglufjörður and its surrounding area, eventually turning it into the sleepy, beautiful town that it is today.

[Source of background information: Wikipedia: The Herring Era Museum.]

Wednesday Wonderment – pt 4

A strange kind of magic

This week, we are travelling a bit to the north to touch the arctic circle.  Last year, I had the pleasure to spend 4 days in Iceland, which were not nearly enough to take in its beauty, but gave me a taste for more.

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Lake Mývatn

For 3 of the 4 days, I stayed in Akureyri, which is on the northern coast of Iceland; it is the second largest population center in Iceland with around 18,000 people.  Through AirBnB, I had found a lovely farm where I had a room overlooking a fjord, and wonderful hosts.

I did my exploring in the area around Akureyri and found some amazing sights, such as the Mývatn area, where I found this rather surreal landscape.  Lesser known than the Blue Lagoon in southern Iceland, Lake Mývatn is also the beneficiary of a geothermal plant.  The light blue hue is due to the rich mineral content of the silica sediment that settles on the bottom; think lots of sulphur!

Hope you enjoy this image!